About the email marketing research

To complete this article/research, I’ve analyzed fifteen marketers who are already in my inbox.

I’ve analyzed multiple aspects of their email marketing strategy. Most of the results are included in this research. Other parts I will treat separately in the future.

These marketers have the following characteristics:

  1. I’ve been subscribed to their newsletter for some time and I am very familiar with their work.
  2. They have large lists & give email marketing a lot of importance.
  3. They are very good at email marketing.

To do the numerical part of this research, I concentrated on the last 30 newsletters I received from each one at the time I started this study. This was around March 10th, 2015.

Brian Dean is the only exception. I took his last twenty emails because I did not have thirty.

In total, I analyzed 440 emails (30 x 14) + 20 = 440.

I used these 440 emails for the quantitative part of the research (all the numbers you’ll see). For the qualitative part, I include examples of newsletters that go beyond these thirty.

The analysis of the subscribe forms and lead magnets was done on the second half of April 2015.

When you check these results, bear in mind that …

One of the great advantages of email marketing is that certain emails and campaigns can be triggered based on subscriber behavior.

Depending on how a subscriber interacts with a newsletter; if he opens it or what he clicks on, he may get a different experience from the one I got.

While the majority of people who do email marketing do not send triggered based email campaigns, some of these marketers do…

I calculated send days & times based on the times I received these newsletters. I’m in Madrid so I calculated send times (EST) by subtracted six hours to the hour when I received them.

Certain types of subscription forms, especially forms present in the content (content upgrades and forms at the bottom of the post) are not present in all pages of the website.  They are present in some.  I’ve considered that a blogger uses such type of form as long as I’ve seen it used at least once. Although I’ve checked a few pages of each blog, I’ve not checked all pages.  This means that some of the bloggers might have used it, but I have not considered it.

Challenges when doing this analysis:

  • Some of the newsletters received may be autoresponders which are difficult to spot.
  • The presence/use of cookies may prevent certain pop ups or certain forms from showing up. To avoid this, I’ve done this research with incognito windows.
  • I’ve spotted a few A/B split tests going on. Some of the pop ups and forms analyzed may be A/B tests.
  • Some email marketing services are configured to send emails at the time a person opted in (especially autoresponders).

Despite the above, what’s included in this study is a good reflection of the email marketing strategies and tactics these 15 marketers use.

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